• ENGLISH COURSES

  •  

    English 7 A/B

    In English 7, you will investigate the thematic concept of choice. All of us make choices every day. Some of those choices have a short-term impact (like what to have for lunch), while others have a greater impact (like whether to study in school or to goof off!). You will learn about Nelson Mandela’s choice to fight segregation—even though it meant going to jail—in South Africa by reading from his autobiography. A famous poem by Robert Frost, the novel Tangerine, Sojourner Truth’s famous speech on slavery, and a drama by Shakespeare all show you the choices that real and imaginary characters make and how those choices affect their lives. Close reading strategies will help you to determine what each text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from what it does not say explicitly. Writing and speaking will focus on text-based evidence. For example, you and your peers will write a literary analysis of a novel and include findings from research to produce a multimedia biographical presentation. Much like in 6th grade, you will be asked to write in argumentative, informational, and narrative modes. You will also look at print texts and then examine how those same texts are portrayed in film. Dramas are like a film done on stage, and you will get to star in a performance of a scene from another of Shakespeare’s plays.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

  • English 7 Honors A/B

    A language arts accelerated program at the middle level will include an environment where students experience learning that is more cognitively complex than the general education offering; that is faster paced; and is characterized by greater depth of content. It is necessary to note that SpringBoard is the basic education curricular framework offered in general education and accelerated classrooms for grades 7 and 8 language arts. SpringBoard is the College Board’s default college preparation curriculum. Thus language arts accelerated class sections are designed to extend and advance our most advanced literacy learners. A pre-course summer assignment is required for this course.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 7

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • English 8 A/B

    In English 8, units of study focus on the theme of challenges. Among the many texts that you will read are an essay about Civil War heroes, narratives about the Holocaust, a novel and short story by Ray Bradbury, Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech, poetry by Walt Whitman, and a play by Shakespeare. These texts take you into the world of heroes—both everyday heroes and extraordinary ones—who face challenges and take actions to overcome them. You will learn about an archetype of a hero, which is a model that writers follow in creating stories about heroes. Writing and speaking opportunities are varied and engaging. For example, you will write a hero’s journey narrative about a hero of your choice, along with essays and an argument that presents your position on an issue in a compelling way. Using research on an issue of national or global significance, you will create an informative multimedia presentation. Viewing film is also a part of researching and analyzing what authors are communicating. As part of studying comedy and Shakespeare, you will analyze scenes from the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream and then view those scenes in film to determine how and why a film director may have changed the scenes.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

  • English 8 Honors A/B

    A language arts accelerated program at the middle level will include an environment where students experience learning that is more cognitively complex than the general education offering; that is faster paced; and is characterized by greater depth of content. It is necessary to note that SpringBoard is the basic education curricular framework offered in general education and accelerated classrooms for grades 7 and 8 language arts. SpringBoard is the College Board’s default college preparation curriculum. Thus language arts accelerated class sections are designed to extend and advance our most advanced literacy learners. A pre-course summer assignment is required for this course.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 8

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

  • English 9 A/B

    Investigating the thematic concept of coming of age. Students will read Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird; informational articles about college; short stories by Poe and Collier; historical articles about segregation; poetry by Wordsworth, Neruda, and Cardiff; and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. From the reading, students will gather evidence from texts and incorporate it in written and oral responses, including a presentation using multiple forms of media. Students will encounter more varied and complex writing in this grade as they write in a variety of modes including argumentative, informational, and narrative writing. Film texts are a large part of Grade 9 activities. In Unit 2, students will study a film director’s style and analyze how style is evident in the transformation of print texts to films. In Unit 5, students will study Romeo and Juliet and analyze how key scenes are represented in multiple film versions as well as the print text.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 9

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

     

  • English 9 Honors A/B

    The focus of this course is to offer students an extension of the core curriculum of English 9. Enrichment activities and assignments are provided throughout the course. The completion of this course prepares students to take advanced placement classes later in high school.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 9

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 9

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • English 10 A/B

    In this grade, students will explore the thematic concept of culture. Texts include Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Sophocles’ Antigone, Susan B. Anthony’s “On Women’s Right to Vote,” and the Nobel Prize acceptance speeches of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Elie Wiesel. Students will be challenged to use evidence from these texts in both written and oral responses. For example, students will study the extent to which one’s culture influences one’s worldview, and incorporate textual evidence in a written argument. Research plays a role as students investigate the Ibo culture represented in Things Fall Apart and present their findings in a collaborative presentation with digital media. Film texts play a role when students analyze the degree of objectivity and subjectivity present in documentary films while also gathering evidence about environmental issues.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 10

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 10

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • English Honors 10 A/B

    The focus of this course is to offer students an extension of the core curriculum of English 10. Enrichment activities and assignments are provided throughout the course. The completion of this course prepares students to take more demanding, advanced placement classes. 

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 10

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 10

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

  • English 11 A/B

    In this grade, students will explore the concept of the American Dream. Students will read foundational U.S. documents such as Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address and The Declaration of Independence, essays by Thoreau and Emerson, poetry by Hughes and Whitman, Arthur Miller’s drama The Crucible, and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God. These texts will help students gather evidence to incorporate in an informative essay defining what it means to be an American and a synthesis essay that argues whether or not America still provides access to the American Dream. Students will compare both print and film versions of The Crucible, and study various features of news outlets while working collaboratively to create their own news outlet.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 11

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 11

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP English Language & Composition A/B

    The Advanced Placement English Language and Composition will engage students in becoming skilled readers of primarily nonfiction prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and reading will make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students may elect, in the spring, to take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 11-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 11 or English 12 (depending on year taken)

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • Bridge to College English 12 A/B

    This course focuses on the English Language Arts key readiness standards from Washington State’s K-12 Learning Standards for English Language Arts (the Common Core State Standards, CCSS-ELA). The course is designed to prepare students for entrance into post-secondary credit-bearing courses. The course addresses lessons in critical reading, academic writing, speaking and listening, research and inquiry, and language use.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 12

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP English Literature & Compostion A/B

    This course, comparable to an introductory college literature course, teaches careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature from various cultures and time periods. Composition assignments include paragraphs, timed essays, formal essays (personal, expository, and argumentative), and a literary analysis research paper. Students may elect, in the spring, to take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam in Literature and Composition.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-course Summer Assignment

    Grade: 11-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: English 11 or English 12 (depending on year taken)

    A: Fall B: Spring


  • MATH COURSES

  • Accelerated Middle School Math A/B

    Accelerated math is offered for students who want to take the high school course of Algebra 1 as an eighth grader, thus allowing them to reach Advanced Placement Calculus or Statistics as a high school senior. This course offers a combination of seventh grade and eighth grade math by completing two years of math topics in one year. Students must be able to learn math topics quickly in order to be successful in this course. Students will explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and communicate their ideas clearly as they work through mathematical concepts.

    In Accelerated Math, students will add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers, including positive and negative fractions, decimals and integers. Students will explore proportional relationships found in similar figures. They will solve a variety of linear equations and inequalities. They will represent and determine the slope and y-intercept of linear functions with verbal descriptions, tables, graphs and symbolic expressions. Students will work with lines and angles, especially as they solve problems involving triangles, using square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem. Students will extend their understanding of surface area and volume to include finding surface area and volume of cylinders and volume of cones and pyramids. Students will broaden their understanding of probability. Additionally, they will build on their extensive experience organizing and interpreting data, by using mean, med

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • Middle School Math 1 A/B

    Middle School Math 1 (MS1) is the course for most seventh grade students and provides the foundation elements for Algebra and beyond. Students will explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and mathematically communicate their ideas clearly as they work through concepts. A summary of the major concepts and procedures learned in this course follows.

    In seventh grade, student will analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. They a will apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. Students will use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions and solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. They will also, draw, construct and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them along with solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume. Students will use random sampling to draw inferences about a population, and draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. Finally, they will investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • Middle School Math 2 A/B

    Middle School Math 2 continues to build on the concepts introduced in seventh grade. Students will continue to deepen their understanding of mathematics in preparation for high school mathematics. Students will continue to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and mathematical communicate their ideas clearly as they work through concepts. A summary of the major concepts and procedures learned in this course follows.

    In eighth grade, students know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by rational numbers. Students will be introduced to scientific notation, the laws of exponents. They will understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations. They will represent and determine the slope and y-intercept of linear functions with verbal descriptions, tables, graphs and symbolic expressions. They will also understand congruence and similarity, solve problems involving triangles, and apply the Pythagorean Theorem. Students will solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones and spheres. Students will build on their extensive experience organizing and interpreting data, by using mean, median, and mode to analyze, summarize, and describe information.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • Algebra 1 A/B

    Algebra will weave together a variety of concepts, procedures and processes in mathematics. Students will develop the ability to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others and communicate their ideas clearly as they work through these mathematical concepts and algebraic procedures. Topics for this course include a study of linear, quadratic and exponential functions as well as statistics. Use of the graphing calculator is an integral part of this course.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Geometry A/B

    Students will explore the basic concepts and methods of Euclidean Geometry while deepening their understanding about plane and solid geometry. Course topics include reasoning and proof, line and angle relationships, two and three dimensional figures, coordinate plane geometry, geometric transformations, surface area and volume. Core processes include reasoning, problem solving and communication.

    Pre-Requisites: Algebra 1 A/B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Algebra 2 A/B

    Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The practice standards; problems solving, communication and connections apply throughout this course. Through the content and practice standards, students will experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Use of the graphing calculator is an integral part of this course. The Smarter Balanced Assessment taken during the junior year tests mathematics content through this course and is a graduation requirement beginning with the class of 2019.

    Pre-Requisites: Geometry A/B or Intermediate Math

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Pre-Calculus A/B

    The course is designed for students who are preparing for mathematics or a mathematics-related career. Included are an integrated development of advanced algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and an introduction to calculus. This course is a prerequisite to calculus. Use of the graphing calculator is an integral part of this course.

    Pre-Requisites: Algebra 2 A/B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP Calculus AB A/B

    AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-Calculus A-B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • AP Calculus BC A/B

    Explore the key concepts, methods, and applications of single-variable calculus including all topics covered in AP Calculus AB (functions, graphs, and limits, derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus) as well as additional topics in differential and integral calculus, such as parametric, polar and vector functions, and series.

    Pre-Requisites: Pre-Calculus A-B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • AP Statistics A/B

    The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

    Pre-Requisites: Algebra 2A-B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Math

    A: Fall B: Spring


  • SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

  • Social Studies 7 

    In the seventh grade, students will continue in their study of world history from 6th grade, focusing on major societies, world religions, events and movements that existed from 600 CE to 1450 CE. Through this study, students will develop enduring understandings of core concepts and ideas in civics, economics, geography, and history. Students will also develop skills in the areas of research, reading, and writing. Research instruction will include writing a guiding research question, selecting sources, evaluating information for relevancy and accuracy, drawing conclusions, evaluating primary and secondary sources, distinguishing among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 1 semester

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • Washington State History - Middle School

    In seventh grade, students become more proficient with the core concepts in social studies. Students study Washington State from its earliest inhabitants to the present day. The study of Washington State includes an examination of the various native people that inhabited what is now Washington State. a look at multiple cultural and immigrant groups that settled in Washington State, a survey of the history of Washington State from its beginnings through the 20tth century, and a study of Washington’s foundational documents including the purpose, structure, and organization, of government at the local and state level. **Successful completion of WA State History is a requirement for High School Graduation. Students who fail this course will be required to successfully complete this requirement through one of two options: successfully completing a summer school course or successfully completing the WA State History SVL course.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 1 semester

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

     

  • 8th Grade American Studies A/B

    In eighth grade, students develop a new, more abstract level of understanding of social studies concepts. The context for developing this understanding is U.S. history and government from the era of the beginning of the American Revolution to the end of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students learn about the American Revolution, in which the ideas, people, society, and events of the period are evaluated. Students will also learn about the United States Constitution and the development and construction of the United States government. Students will assess how the ideals, values, and principles that drive the United States’ culture – including those described in its foundational documents – can be applied to a historical or modern situation. Students will also analyze the growth of the United States, especially its expansion westward. Students will describe how the idea of Manifest Destiny and its migration patterns shaped the expansion of the United States. Students will also evaluate the effects that Manifest Destiny had on other cultures. Finally, students will study causes, events, and effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction, especially where social, political, and economic elements are concerned.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring

     

  • AP European History A/B

    This two semester course covers major trend, and events from approximately 1450 (High Renaissance) to the present. Major themes are the political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social and economic history of this era, including Interaction of Europe and the World, Poverty and Prosperity, Objective Knowledge and Subjective Visions, States and Other Institutions of Power, and Individuals and Society. Course work is equivalent to a college introductory course. If successfully completed, this course will fulfill the world history social studies requirement. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: World History, Elective

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • AP Human Geography A/B

    The purpose of AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systemic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and altercation of earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: CWA, Grades 9-12

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • AP World History A/B

    AP World History offers students a broad view of events, ideas and movements that have led to the contemporary world. This course has a brief review of ancient human history, but largely covers the history of major civilizations from 1450 to the present. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-10

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: World History

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • World History A/B

    The 9th/10th grade World History course will ask students to engage in the civics, geography, history, and economy of a variety of cultures through a variety of time frames, often through a project-based format. Special attention will be given to helping students work with their informational reading and writing skills throughout the year.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-10

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: World History

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP US History A/B

    The one-year Advanced Placement US History program is a comprehensive college-level course that is organized chronologically. Students will study US History from the pre-Columbian era to the present. The assigned readings are from a number of books used in American universities. The teaching and study techniques have been chosen to prepare the student to do excellent work in college. The examinations and papers are similar to those the student will encounter in college work. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 11

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: US History

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • US History A/B

    This two semester course covers major trend, and events from approximately 1450 (High Renaissance) to the present. Major themes are the political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social and economic history of this era, including Interaction of Europe and the World, Poverty and Prosperity, Objective Knowledge and Subjective Visions, States and Other Institutions of Power, and Individuals and Society. Course work is equivalent to a college introductory course. If successfully completed, this course will fulfill the world history social studies requirement. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 11

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: US History

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP Comparative Government

    This course is designed for students wishing to learn more advanced concepts about governments around the world. This course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. Content will include the study of China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia and how politics, institutions, and behaviors shape these nations. Course work is equivalent to a college introductory course. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: CWA, Elective

    A: Fall ONLY

  • AP US Government & Politics

    The AP US Government and Politics course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the US. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires knowledge and understanding of the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute US government and politics. Students may elect to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students who pass the Advanced Placement test will receive college credit from most universities.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Civics, Elective

    A: Fall ONLY

  • Civics

    In this course the students will gain an understanding of the following concepts: Constitutional and Economic Underpinnings of American Government, Political Parties, Beliefs, and Behaviors, Interest Groups and Mass Media, Institutions of Government, Public Policy, Civil Rights and Liberties. Through study of these topics, students will gain a vital understanding of the American system of governance and apply their understanding to an analysis of current issues.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Civics, Elective

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Contemporary World Affairs (CWA)

    This course will examine the key issues facing our world today. The student will bring together the understanding and skills they have developed over the years in social studies to dig deeper into the problems of the environment, the proliferation of weapons, pandemics, terrorism, international conflict, and more.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Contemporary World Affairs

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Washington State History - High School 

    Students that have not yet successfully completed the WA State History requirement for High School Graduation can take this course to fulfill the requirement and earn a .5 elective credit.  In this course, students become more proficient with the core concepts in social studies. Students study Washington State from its earliest inhabitants to the present day. The study of Washington State includes an examination of the various native people that inhabited what is now Washington State. a look at multiple cultural and immigrant groups that settled in Washington State, a survey of the history of Washington State from its beginnings through the 20tth century, and a study of Washington’s foundational documents including the purpose, structure, and organization, of government at the local and state level. 

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 1 semester

    A: Fall, Spring B: Fall, Spring


  • SCIENCE COURSES

  • 7th Grade Science A/B

    This is a life science course which provides seventh grade students the opportunity to learn science concepts and principles, acquire reasoning and problem solving abilities, and develop inquiry skills. It is designed to enable students to attain a fundamental level of scientific literacy that will provide the competencies needed for successful participation in our scientifically and technologically oriented society. Students will learn key biological concepts. Including cells, the human body, heredity, biomechanics of speciation, DNA structure and function, classification systems, and the vital relationships between ourselves and the physical environment.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7

    Length: 2 semesters

    A: Fall, Spring BFall, Spring

  • Science 8 - Physics

    This is a science course that focuses on Physics and Chemistry, providing eighth grade students the opportunity to learn science concepts and principles, acquire reasoning and problem solving abilities, and develop inquiry skills. The eighth grade course is designed to enable students to attain a fundamental level of scientific literacy that will provide the competencies needed for successful participation in our scientifically and technologically oriented society. Students will cover the concepts of matter, energy, force, motion, waves, light, temperature, heat, physical and chemical properties, atoms, behavior of gases, elements and chemical changes.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 1 semester

    A: Fall, Spring BFall, Spring

  • Science 8 - Chemistry

    This is a science course that focuses on Physics and Chemistry, providing eighth grade students the opportunity to learn science concepts and principles, acquire reasoning and problem solving abilities, and develop inquiry skills. The eighth grade course is designed to enable students to attain a fundamental level of scientific literacy that will provide the competencies needed for successful participation in our scientifically and technologically oriented society. Students will cover the concepts of matter, energy, force, motion, waves, light, temperature, heat, physical and chemical properties, atoms, behavior of gases, elements and chemical changes.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 1 semester

    A: Fall, Spring BFall, Spring

  • Biology A/B

    Biology is the study of living systems, and interactions between living and non-living systems. Biology is a year-long introductory lab science course designed for ninth grade students. Using the Next Generation Science Standards as a guide, students explore essential questions underlying topics in cellular biology, heredity, evolution and ecosystems. Questions guiding exploration include: “How do organisms live and grow? How and why do organisms interact with their environment, and what are the effects of these interactions? How are characteristics of one generation passed to the next? How can individuals of the same species have different characteristics?” And, “What evidence shows that different species are related?” In addition to acquiring content knowledge specific to biology, students also deepen their understanding of science and engineering practices through hands-on inquiry that involves asking questions, designing and carrying out investigations, and exploring and applying core science concepts that span across and unify all disciplines of science. This course is considered an algebra-based science.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Science (Lab)

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Chemistry A/B

    Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter and its interactions. Chemistry is a year-long introductory lab science course designed for students after their freshman year. Using the Next Generation Science Standards as a guide, students explore essential questions underlying topics including the structure and properties of matter and chemical reactions. Questions guiding exploration include: “How can one explain the structure, properties and interactions of matter?” And “How is energy in chemical reactions transferred and conserved?” In addition to acquiring content knowledge specific to chemistry, students also deepen their understanding of science and engineering practices through hands-on inquiry that involves asking questions, designing and carrying out investigations, and exploring and applying core science concepts that span across and unify all disciplines of science. This course is considered an algebra-based science.

    Pre-Requisites:  Algebra 1 A/B or Geometry A/B

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Science (Lab)

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Anatomy & Physiology A/B

    This course involves an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. Students learn how anatomy and physiology are interrelated and how the body maintains internal balance. Various human body systems are studied in depth at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. This course involves hands-on investigations, including dissections. This course should be of high interest to students who are considering health science careers or who simply want a deeper understanding of the biology of the human body.

    Pre-Requisites:   Biology plus one additional science course

    Grade: 11-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Science (Lab)

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer


  • FITNESS & HEATLH COURSES

  • Health

    This required class focuses on a variety of health concepts and skills to help you plan for personal lifelong health goals. The skills to enhance health that you will develop, demonstrate, and apply include the following: analyzing influences on health behaviors; accessing valid information, products and services; using interpersonal communication; using decision-making; using goal-setting; practicing health-enhancing behaviors; and, advocating for personal, family and community health. These skills will be woven into core ideas such as wellness, diseases, nutrition, safety, stress/social emotional health, substance use and abuse, and sexual health.

    Pre-Requisites:   None

    Grade: 9-12 (Recommended at Grade 9)

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Health

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Intro to Health Science Careers

    Are you interested in a career in the medical field that has job security, high wages and makes a significant difference in people’s lives? In this class you will explore careers in all areas of health care. You will take field trips to multiple health related sites and hear from guest speakers who currently work in health careers. You will learn basic human anatomy, medical terminology, diseases and basic medical skills through hands on activities. Some of the skills that you will develop and apply include analyzing influences on health behaviors; accessing valid information, products and services; using interpersonal communication; using decision-making; using goal-setting; practicing health-enhancing behaviors; and, advocating for personal, family and community health. Handling stress, making ethical decisions, working with a diverse population and leadership skills will be emphasized. This class satisfies the Health graduation requirement, or half of the Career and Technical Education graduation requirement.

    Pre-Requisites:   None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Health, CTE

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Intro to Fitness

    In this first in a series of 3 required semesters of fitness, you will participate in a variety of activities (sports, games, and fitness) in which you will demonstrate competency in activity specific skills; apply knowledge of concepts, principles, strategies and tactics related to movement and performance; demonstrate knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness; exhibit responsible personal and social behavior; and recognize the value of physical activity. You will take a look at your individual health behaviors and analyze your current fitness levels, demonstrate your ability to set and adjust individual fitness goals, and create and implement a personal health and fitness plan. 

    Grade: 9-11 (Recommended at Grade 9)

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Fitness

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Intro to Fitness - Student Athlete

    This course is the online version of Intro to Fitness for the student athlete. You will access course content and submit assignments and assessments through Blackboard. The activity portion of the course is completed through participation in an approved community or school activity. Students in this course earn a letter grade.  More information can be obtained through the Spokane Virtual Learning website or through your school counselor. Note:  This course is for High School students ONLY.

    Pre-Requisites:   None

    Grade: 9-11 (Recommended at Grade 9)

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Fitness

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Lifetime Fitness A/B

    In this required course, you will expand on the concepts and skills in Intro to Fitness. You will refine activity specific skills, apply principles and create strategies to improve performance. You will take a leadership role and apply best practices for creating a safe physical activity environment. You will create, implement, monitor, self-assess, and modify a personal fitness and nutrition plan. The fitness center and heart rate monitors will be used to monitor progress towards fitness goals. 

    Pre-Requisites for Semester A: Intro to Fitness

    Pre-Requisites for Semester B: Semester A of Lifetime Fitness or Equivalent

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Fitness, Elective

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer

  • Lifetime Fitness - Student Athlete A/B

    This course is the online version of Intro to Fitness for the student athlete. You will access course content and submit assignments and assessments through Blackboard. The activity portion of the course is completed through participation in an approved community or school activity. Students in this course earn a letter grade.  More information can be obtained through the Spokane Virtual Learning website or through your school counselor. Note:  This course is for High School students ONLY.

    Pre-Requisites for Semester A: Intro to Fitness

    Pre-Requisites for Semester B: Semester A of Lifetime Fitness or Equivalent

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Fitness, Elective

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer BFall, Spring, Summer


  • WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES

  • Chinese 1 A/B

    The first year of Chinese is a highly communicative introduction to the language and it is the base upon which levels 2, 3 are built. Students will learn important foundational knowledge, vocabulary, and grammar and they will be asked to put their knowledge to work in real-life settings. Students will be able to recognize and pronounce Pinyin, the phonics system, and they will use classroom expressions in certain classroom situations. Students will be able to explain how Chinese characters evolved and identify the most common traditional radicals. Students can greet people, tell time, age, nationality and grade in school, talk about school subjects, identify and describe family members and pets, discuss dates and months of the year, exchange phone numbers, express likes and dislikes, and give and response to invitations. 

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • French 1 A/B

    The first year of a world language is a highly communicative introduction to the language and it is the base upon which levels 2, 3, 4 and AP are built. Students will learn important vocabulary and grammar and they will be asked to put their knowledge to work in real-life settings. They will be able to talk about their lives, their family and friends, discuss and inquire about weather and pastimes, order food at a restaurant, find their way around a foreign city, and function in new situations. Grammar includes present tense regular and some irregular verbs, adjective agreement, syntax and much more. Students will be reading, writing, listening and speaking every day in class and they will be studying the culture of the people who speak the target language as well as their customs. 

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • French 2 A/B

    Second year study enables students to expand vocabulary and explore the target language using more complicated structures and systems such as past tenses, future tense and reflexive verbs, . As students increase their ability to understand, they will be speaking with more confidence and complexity. In addition, they will read short selections and stories at more advanced levels. They will be able to talk about where they live, life after school, clothing, vacations and professions. Classwork will be conducted in the language as much as possible to provide practice in expression and comprehension. Students’ cultural awareness expands through a multimedia, hands-on approach. 

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of French 1

    Grade: 8-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • French 3 A/B

    The third year of language is the year when all the pieces of language come together. Students will read authentic pieces of literature, watch and comprehend foreign films, learn sophisticated vocabulary, grammar, syntax and speak and learn totally in the target language. Third year language study offers students the opportunity to go beyond the basics and attain a higher level of fluency and competency in all language skills. Grammar includes compound tenses, the Subjunctive, double object pronouns and the comparative and superlative. Activities may include creative, self-directed projects and presentations. Students will be encouraged to communicate predominately in the language. Note: Some universities require 3 years of a world language for admission.

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of French 2

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • French 4 A/B

    Fourth-year courses enable students to attain a high degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and understanding the language. Practice in listening, conversation skills and reading novels in the target language is emphasized along with deeper understanding of history and traditions. Students learn advanced grammar and syntax and classes are conducted entirely in the target language. 

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of French 3

    Grade: 10-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Japanese 1 A/B

    This is an introductory Japanese course designed to learn basic communication skills: comprehension, pronunciation, socializing skills, communication of factual information in a variety of contexts. Basic vocabulary, grammar, characters and culture information are introduced during this year through every day conversation. By end of year 1, the students will be able to introduce themselves with appropriate manners, engage in classroom conversations, talk about family, express likes/dislikes/skills, describe appearance and personality, and share their daily routine in Japanese. 

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Japanese 2 A/B

    Japanese 2 develops more deeply into culture and language. Students learn more advanced language structures in the context of real world issues. More KANJI is introduced as well as the second set of the Japanese alphabets KATAKANA. Vocabulary, grammar, characters and cultural information are introduced through a variety of settings the students might encounter in real life. By end of year 2, the students will be able to communicate about their life in school and outside of school, express their health concerns and conditions at the doctor, discuss the sports they play, and shop for products by negotiating prices and using Japanese currency. 

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Japanese 1

    Grade: 8-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Japanese 3 A/B

    Japanese 3 deepens their understanding of Japanese language and culture. More Kanji, history, and traditions are studied. Japanese etiquette is enhanced and language skills refined through video, movies, or print media. Students will be speaking and writing more in year 3. Students will learn school rules, driving, restaurant and holidays. By the end of year 3, students can have a conversation about school rules, traditions and holidays to name a few. Japanese 2 must be successfully completed to take year 3. Note: Some universities require 3 years of a world language for admission.

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Japanese 2

    Grade: 9 -12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Japanese 4 A/B

    Japanese 4 takes language study to the next step. Students will acquire higher fluency in speaking and writing. More Kanji will be learned. Japanese history, traditions and etiquette will be the focus. Cultural videos, movies and authentic text will allow students to practice their skills. By the end of year 4 students will be able to express feelings, give advice, talk or write about sports and jobs, Japanese folk tales or plays.

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Japanese 3

    Grade: 10-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Latin 1 A/B

    The first year of a world language is a highly communicative introduction to the language and it is the base upon which levels 2 and 3 are built. Students will learn important vocabulary and grammar and they will be asked to put their knowledge to work in real-life settings. They will be able to read and write about family and friends, discuss and inquire about weather and pastimes, use Roman numerals, shop, and function in new situations. Additionally, there is a focus on the connections between Latin and English, Grammar includes present and imperfect tense regular verbs, declensions, adjective agreement, syntax and the nominative, accusative, and dative cases.  Students will be reading, writing, listening and speaking every day in class and they will be studying the culture of the people who speak the target language as well as their customs.  

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Latin 2 A/B

    Second year study enables students to expand vocabulary and explore the target language using more complicated structures and systems such as past tenses, future tense, reflexive verbs and the subjunctive. As students increase their ability to understand, they will be translating with more confidence and complexity. In addition, they will read short selections and stories at more advanced levels, including original Roman writings.  They will be able to talk about the history and culture of Rome, as well as learn to communicate about food, education, and life events.  Classwork will be conducted in the language as much as possible to provide practice in expression and comprehension. Students’ cultural awareness expands through a multimedia, hands-on approach.  

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Latin 1

    Grade: 8-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Latin 3 A/B

    The third year of language is the year when all the pieces of language come together. Students will read and translate authentic pieces of literature including poetry, prose, and biography, learn sophisticated vocabulary, grammar, syntax and speak and learn totally in the target language. Third year language study offers students the opportunity to go beyond the basics and attain a higher level of fluency and competency in all language skills.  Grammar includes complex sentence structures, a review of all tenses, indicative vs subjunctive mood, and more uses of the ablative case.   Activities may include creative, self-directed projects and presentations. Students will be encouraged to communicate predominately in the language. Note: Some universities require 3 years of a world language for admission.

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Latin 2

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Spanish 1 A/B

    The first year of a world language is a highly communicative introduction to the language and it is the base upon which levels 2,3,4 and AP are built. Students will learn important vocabulary and grammar and they will be asked to put their knowledge to work in real-life settings. They will be able to talk about their lives, their family and friends, discuss and inquire about weather and pastimes, order food at a restaurant, shop, find their way around a foreign city, and function in new situations. Grammar includes present tense regular and some irregular verbs, adjective agreement, syntax and much more. Students will be reading, writing, listening and speaking every day in class and they will be studying the culture of the people who speak the target language as well as their customs.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 7-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Spanish 2 A/B

    Second year study enables students to expand vocabulary and explore the target language using more complicated structures and systems such as past tenses and reflexive verbs, . As students increase their ability to understand, they will be speaking with more confidence and complexity. In addition, they will read short selections and stories at more advanced levels. They will be able to talk about where they live, life after school, clothing, technology, vacations by plane and train and family celebrations. Classwork will be conducted in the language as much as possible to provide practice in expression and comprehension. Students’ cultural awareness expands through a multimedia, hands-on approach. 

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Spanish 1

    Grade: 8-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Spanish 3 A/B

    The third year of language is the year when all the pieces of language come together. Students will read authentic pieces of literature, watch and comprehend foreign films, learn sophisticated vocabulary, grammar, syntax and speak and learn totally in the target language. Third year language study offers students the opportunity to go beyond the basics and attain a higher level of fluency and competency in all language skills. Grammar includes the imperative, the Subjunctive, double object pronouns and the present perfect. Activities may include creative, self-directed projects and presentations. Students will be encouraged to communicate predominately in the language. Note: Some universities require 3 years of a world language for admission.

    Pre-Requisites: Successful Completion of Spanish 2

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring

  • Spanish 4 A/B

    Fourth-year courses enable students to attain a high degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and understanding the language. Practice in listening, conversation skills and reading novels in the target language is emphasized along with deeper understanding of history and traditions. Students learn advanced grammar and syntax such as highly irregular past tense verbs, progressive tenses, the subjunctive in all its forms, the passive voice and all perfect tenses. In addition, the text studies many places/areas of the Spanish speaking world, looking at each region’s culture, geography and history.  You will also work with authentic news articles that come from that part of the world as well as poetry and prose that originates from the area being studied. The classes are conducted entirely in the target language. 

    Pre-Requisites:  Successful Completion of Spanish 3

    Grade: 10-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Elective

    A: Fall BSpring


  • CAREER & TECHNICAL (CTE) COURSES

  • AP Computer Science A/B

    Advanced Placement Computer Science provides instruction in the use of the JAVA programming language to design, write, and analyze programs and subprograms in preparation for the AP Computer Science exam.

    Pre-Requisites:  Algebra 1 Preferred

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: CTE

    A: Fall BSpring

  • College, Career & Life Readiness

    College, Career, and Life Readiness provides students with the opportunity to focus on practical, concrete skills which enhance the ability of individuals and families to be effective and productive in careers, at home, and in the world. Through the integration of technology, students practice important consumer, family and work skills including positive relationships, child development knowledge, human growth and development, foods and nutrition, career exploration, money management, college and career planning and drug, tobacco, and alcohol education. In addition, this class embeds the important skills of reading, writing, communicating, problem solving and decision making about real everyday issues.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 8

    Length: 1 Semester

    A: Fall, Spring BFall, Spring

  • Certified Computer Applications Specialist

    These courses introduce advanced computer applications and cover all aspects of the Microsoft Office suite. Students completing these courses may earn Microsoft User Specialist Certifications in the areas of Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Desktop publishing, graphics, web pages, and multi-media video editing are also taught.

    Pre-Requisites:  Computer Applications

    Grade: 9 -12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: CTE

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP Studio Art: 2D (Digital Photography) A/B

    Advanced Placement 2D Studio Art is for art students that are interested in completing the AP Digital Photography Portfolio to submit to the College Board to receive college credit.  Students are challenged to develop their own work while meeting the requirements for the portfolio as stated by the College Board.  This class explores a variety of mediums, subject matters, and styles of digital photography.

    Pre-Requisites:  Digital Photography

    Grade: 9 -12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art, CTE

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • Digital Photography A/B

    In this course you will gain knowledge of fundamental competencies in electronic digital cameras: image capture, lighting, lenses, scanning both negative and positive images in black and white and in color, with a greater emphasis on color. This class may be used for ProfessionalTechnical OR Visual/Performing Art credit. Articulated College credit at SCC is available for completing specific skills in this course. Lab fee may be required plus cost for special projects

    Pre-Requisites:  None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art, CTE

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Web Design

    This project-based class teaches professional web design using Adobe Creative Suite and other popular software. The curriculum is designed to teach the full process of designing, developing, and managing the creation of websites. Students create multimedia websites using Dreamweaver, web graphics and digital photography with Photoshop and other photo editing and drawing programs, web animation with Flash, and web video editing software. Students interested in the area of web development are encouraged to take this class.

    Pre-Requisites:  None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 1 semester

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art, CTE

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer


  • ELECTIVE COURSES

  • Individually Designed Studies A/B

    Study what YOU want to study - Design your own course of study. Choose your own courses from hundreds of options (www.coursera.org). Earn high school credit while taking college courses of interest with an opportunity to learn from professors at Yale, Princeton, Penn, Stanford, Brown and many more universities. Other Benefits: Sample majors BEFORE you get to college, get a head start on your college interests or your career path, list courses and certificates in your college application.  Students can earn up to a full year elective credit (1.0).  Students can choose from classes like this and many more: Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and Game Design and Development, Graphic Design, How to Start Your Own Business, iOS App Development, Buddhism and Modern Psychology, Creative Writing, Systems Biology and Biotechnology, The Art of Music Production, Become a Journalist, Modern Art and Ideas, Mathematical Biostatistics, Fibonacci Numbers and the Golden Ratio … explore www.coursera.org for more course offerings.

    Pre-Requisites: None

    Grade: 11-12

    Length: 2 Semesters

    A: Fall, Spring BFall, Spring


  • FINE ART COURSES

  • AP Studio Art: 2D (Digital Photography) A/B

    Advanced Placement 2D Studio Art is for art students that are interested in completing the AP Digital Photography Portfolio to submit to the College Board to receive college credit.  Students are challenged to develop their own work while meeting the requirements for the portfolio as stated by the College Board.  This class explores a variety of mediums, subject matters, and styles of digital photography.

    Pre-Requisites:  Digital Photography

    Grade: 10-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art, CTE

    A: Fall B: Spring

  • Digital Photography A/B

    In this course you will gain knowledge of fundamental competencies in electronic digital cameras: image capture, lighting, lenses, scanning both negative and positive images in black and white and in color, with a greater emphasis on color. This class may be used for ProfessionalTechnical OR Visual/Performing Art credit. Articulated College credit at SCC is available for completing specific skills in this course. Lab fee may be required plus cost for special projects

    Pre-Requisites:  None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art, CTE

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Drawing, Painting, & Sculpting A/B

    Drawing, Sculpting and Painting (formerly Color & Design) Students explore a variety of media providing a foundation in the elements and principles of art with an emphasis on drawing, sculpting and painting. The study of art history, cultures, and artists will provide vocabulary skills and a foundation for students to discuss and evaluate their own work in a supportive atmosphere. This course is a suggested prerequisite for all other 2D & 3D visual art classes.

    Pre-Requisites:  None

    Grade: 9-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer

  • AP Music Theory A/B

    This course is designed to provide instruction and preparation at the advanced level required for successful completion of the AP Music Theory Exam, including music literacy (musical notation and terminology), aural skills (sight singing and dictation), form and analysis, and composition.

    Pre-Requisites: Proficiency in reading rhythmic notation is fundamental.

    Grade: 11-12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art

    A: Fall  B: Spring

  • Music Theory A/B

    The fundamentals of music will be explored in this class. The student will learn the basics of harmony, melody, and rhythm as well as other aspects of music composition and arranging. This class is for the student who would like to eventually be able to compose or arrange music. Previous experience in instrumental or vocal music is recommended.

    Pre-Requisites: Proficiency in reading rhythmic notation is fundamental.

    Grade: 9 -12

    Length: 2 semesters

    Graduation Requirement Credit: Art

    A: Fall, Spring, Summer B: Fall, Spring, Summer