Curriculum Connection

 

 

Higher Education Panel Discussion on Standards-Based Grading and Reporting. Questions and Answers.


Why Standards Based Grading?

Student Achievement

Standards-based grading and reporting (SBGR) allows us to more accurately and consistently report student achievement to students and families as it relates to state and local standards.

  • Grades are more accurate
  • Consistent across schools
  • More challenging and rigorous
  • Separates achievement and effort

Standards Based Grading Handbook for Elementary

Principle 1

Grades and Reports Should Be Based on Clearly Specified Learning Goals and Performance Standards.

Example:

All 2nd graders in Spokane Public Schools, no matter their school, will be graded using the same standards.

Principle 2

Evidence Used for Grading Should Be Valid.

Example:

Students are assessed on what they are taught. There are no trick questions and no surprises.

Principle 3

Grading Should Be Based on Established Criteria, Not on Arbitrary Norms.

Example:

On a math assessment, students are graded on the math standards assessed, not on arbitrary norms such as poor handwriting or no name on their paper.

Principle 4

Not Everything Should be Included in Grades.

Example:

Your children are not graded as they are learning the information, but after the learning has occurred.

Students need to have enough "practice" in order to be successful in the "game."

Practice is learning time. (Formative - not graded).

The game is to show what you know. (Summative - graded).

Principle 5

Avoid Grading Based on (Mean) Averages.

Example:

Principle 6

Focus on Achievement, and Report Other Factors Seperately.

Example:

Students' achievement should be the only aspect included in their grade.

Students' math grades will reflect their math achievement. However, their work habits and responsibilities during math will be reported separately.


Standards Based Grading and Reporting Handbook for Secondary (Parents)

Standards Based Grading and Reporting Handbook for Secondary (Teachers)

Parent Access to Student Standards Grades (Shaw parents only)

Grading Principles: A Filter for the Work in Spokane Public Schools    Download All of the Principles

 

Principle 1

Grades and Reports Should Be Based on Clearly Specified Learning Goals and Performance Standards.

Example:

All 9th grade, 1st semester English students will be graded on the same standard/targets.

Principle 2

Evidence Used for Grading Should Be Valid.

Principle 3

Grading Should Be Based on Established Criteria, Not on Arbitrary Norms.

Principle 4

Not Everything Should be Included in Grades.

Principle 5

Avoid Grading Based on (Mean) Averages.

Principle 6

Focus on Achievement, and Report Other Factors Seperately.

The Negative Impact of Zeros

In most cases, teachers will be using scores from multiple assessments to measure the learning of a student. This practice provides multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate achievement toward learning targets. Therefore teachers have no need to use zeros.

Think about this...

Zeros have such a powerfully negative impact on the average that they can have a debilitating effect on student motivation (effort optimism). Including zeros also fails to accurately communicate what students really know and can demonstrate.

Does the use of zeros when averaging a grade tell us what a student has learned or can do?

Accurate grades are based on the most consistent evidence...

We look at the pattern of achievement, including trends, not the average of the data. This means we focus on the mode and the most recent scores, not the mean (averages).

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